Competence in Software Technology Examination (CST) 2008 Syllabus

Exams Date »

 

[intlink id=”competence-in-software-technology-examination-cst-2008-3″ type=”post”]Date & Time of CST 2008[/intlink] |
[intlink id=”competence-in-software-technology-examination-cst-2008-3″ type=”post”]CST 2008 Important Dates & Levels of Examination[/intlink] |
[intlink id=”competence-in-software-technology-examination-cst-2008-syllabus-3″ type=”post”]CST 2008 Eligibility Details [/intlink]|
[intlink id=”competence-in-software-technology-examination-cst-2008-syllabus-2″ type=”post”]CST 2008 Syllabus for E Level Exam[/intlink] | [intlink id=”competence-software-technology-examination-cst-2008-cst-2008-competence-software-technology-examination-competence-software-technology-cst-cst-2008-important-dates-cst-2008-syllabus” type=”post”]CST 2008 Syllabus for G Level Exam[/intlink] |
[intlink id=”competence-in-software-technology-examination-cst-2008-2″ type=”post”]Sales Centres for CST 2008 Brouchre[/intlink]

Competence in Software Technology Examination (CST) 2008 Syllabus

Syllabus for I Examination

General Aptitude (GA): Same as that for E Level

Computer Concepts (CC): Same as that for E Level

Computer Programming in C (CP): Data types, expression evaluation, precedence rules, type conversions, sequential structure, selective structure, repetitive structure, functions (including recursion), arrays, pointers, structures and unions, operations on bits, file processing, pre-processor. The syntax assumed will be that of ANSI C. Approximately 20% of the questions will test the candidate’s knowledge of the syntactical structure of ‘C’. The remaining questions will test the candidate’s working knowledge and understanding of the ‘C’.

Syllabus for D Level Examination

General Aptitude (GA): Same as that for E Level

Computer Programming in C (CP): Same as that for I Level

Computer Organization and Operating Systems (CO)

Basic concepts in Computer organization: Boolean algebra, number systems – binary, octal and hexadecimal, fixed point and floating point number representations.

Computer structure – Von Neumann architecture, system bus, CPU instruction cycle, programmed I/O, interrupts and DMA, CPU registers, instruction formats and addressing modes.

Memory organisation – types and hierarchy, model level organization, cache memory performance and design issues such as mapping, replacement and write policies.

CPU Performance Enhancement – Basic idea of RISC and pipelined architectures.

Fundamentals of operating systems – OS services and components, multitasking, multiprogramming, timesharing, buffering, spooling.

Process and thread management – concept of process and threads, process states, process management, context switching, user and kernel mode switching, interaction between processes and OS, multithreading, user and kernel level threads.

Concurrency control – concurrency and race conditions, mutual exclusion requirements, software and hardware solutions, semaphores, monitors, classical IPC problems and solutions, deadlocks – characterization, detection, recovery, avoidance and prevention.

Memory management – memory partitioning, swapping, paging, segmentation, virtual memory, page replacement algorithms.

I/O – interrupt handlers, device drivers, device independent software subsystem.

File systems – file storage, access methods and free space management.

Distributed systems – Basics of parallel, networked and distributed systems.

Security – Need and strategies for security in standalone and networked systems, concept of access control list and capabilities, password and encryption schemes.

Unix Operating System – basic design principles, concepts of kernel and shell, fundamentals of file system, process models and IPC mechanisms.

 

Data Structures and Algorithms (DS)

This paper does not assume an in-depth knowledge of any particular programming language. If and when code segments are required to be given in questions, we will use a pseudo-language based on C/Java.

Abstract data types: Notion of abstract data types and data structures, simple data structures including arrays, stacks, queues and linked lists (linear, circular and doubly-linked).

Trees: Different types of trees including binary trees, complete binary trees, almost complete binary trees, binary search trees, balanced binary trees including AVL trees, heaps, multi-way search trees and B-trees; insertion and deletion of nodes and traversal in each of these types of trees.

Graphs: Representations, directed and undirected graphs, notion of path, path finding algorithms, Dijkstra’s shortest-path algorithm, traversals and spanning trees, minimum spanning tree (algorithms of Kruskal and Prim), applications of graphs such as network flow problem and topological sort.

Algorithms: Order notation; notions of P, NP and NP-complete problems, basics of algorithms design, different classes of algorithms; the following algorithms and their complexity measures: bubble sort, quick sort, selection sort, insertion sort, shell sort, heap sort and merge sort; searching algorithms including sequential search, ordered table search, binary search and binary tree search; hashing (hash collision, primary and secondary clustering, open addressing and chaining techniques, hash functions).

Competence in Software Technology Examination (CST) 2008 Syllabus

Syllabus for I Examination

General Aptitude (GA): Same as that for E Level

Computer Concepts (CC): Same as that for E Level

Computer Programming in C (CP): Data types, expression evaluation, precedence rules, type conversions, sequential structure, selective structure, repetitive structure, functions (including recursion), arrays, pointers, structures and unions, operations on bits, file processing, pre-processor. The syntax assumed will be that of ANSI C. Approximately 20% of the questions will test the candidate’s knowledge of the syntactical structure of ‘C’. The remaining questions will test the candidate’s working knowledge and understanding of the ‘C’.

Syllabus for D Level Examination

General Aptitude (GA): Same as that for E Level

Computer Programming in C (CP): Same as that for I Level

Computer Organization and Operating Systems (CO)

Basic concepts in Computer organization: Boolean algebra, number systems – binary, octal and hexadecimal, fixed point and floating point number representations.

Computer structure – Von Neumann architecture, system bus, CPU instruction cycle, programmed I/O, interrupts and DMA, CPU registers, instruction formats and addressing modes.

Memory organisation – types and hierarchy, model level organization, cache memory performance and design issues such as mapping, replacement and write policies.

CPU Performance Enhancement – Basic idea of RISC and pipelined architectures.

Fundamentals of operating systems – OS services and components, multitasking, multiprogramming, timesharing, buffering, spooling.

Process and thread management – concept of process and threads, process states, process management, context switching, user and kernel mode switching, interaction between processes and OS, multithreading, user and kernel level threads.

Concurrency control – concurrency and race conditions, mutual exclusion requirements, software and hardware solutions, semaphores, monitors, classical IPC problems and solutions, deadlocks – characterization, detection, recovery, avoidance and prevention.

Memory management – memory partitioning, swapping, paging, segmentation, virtual memory, page replacement algorithms.

I/O – interrupt handlers, device drivers, device independent software subsystem.

File systems – file storage, access methods and free space management.

Distributed systems – Basics of parallel, networked and distributed systems.

Security – Need and strategies for security in standalone and networked systems, concept of access control list and capabilities, password and encryption schemes.

Unix Operating System – basic design principles, concepts of kernel and shell, fundamentals of file system, process models and IPC mechanisms.

Data Structures and Algorithms (DS)

This paper does not assume an in-depth knowledge of any particular programming language. If and when code segments are required to be given in questions, we will use a pseudo-language based on C/Java.

Abstract data types: Notion of abstract data types and data structures, simple data structures including arrays, stacks, queues and linked lists (linear, circular and doubly-linked).

Trees: Different types of trees including binary trees, complete binary trees, almost complete binary trees, binary search trees, balanced binary trees including AVL trees, heaps, multi-way search trees and B-trees; insertion and deletion of nodes and traversal in each of these types of trees.

Graphs: Representations, directed and undirected graphs, notion of path, path finding algorithms, Dijkstra’s shortest-path algorithm, traversals and spanning trees, minimum spanning tree (algorithms of Kruskal and Prim), applications of graphs such as network flow problem and topological sort.

Algorithms: Order notation; notions of P, NP and NP-complete problems, basics of algorithms design, different classes of algorithms; the following algorithms and their complexity measures: bubble sort, quick sort, selection sort, insertion sort, shell sort, heap sort and merge sort; searching algorithms including sequential search, ordered table search, binary search and binary tree search; hashing (hash collision, primary and secondary clustering, open addressing and chaining techniques, hash functions).