London Paralympics Games

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London Paralympics Games 2012

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London Paralympics Countdown 2012

1. A digital clock, located in Trafalgar Square, commenced a countdown to the opening ceremony on 14 March 2011.

2. However, less than 24 hours after it was switched on, it suffered a technical failure, and stopped — displaying “500 ( days ) 7 ( hours ) 06 (minutes) 56 (seconds).” It was quickly repaired.

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London Paralympics Public Transport 2012

1. London’s public transport was an element of the bid which was scored poorly in the IOC’s initial evaluation. Transport for London ( TfL ) are carrying out numerous improvements in preparation for 2012, including the expansion of the London Overground’s East London Line, upgrades to the Docklands Light Railway and the North London Line, and the introduction of a new “Javelin” high – speed rail service, using the Hitachi Corporation’s “bullet” trains.

2. TfL also propose the construction of a £25 million cable car across the River Thames, the “Thames Gateway Cable Car”, to link 2012 Olympics venues. It will cross the Thames river between Greenwich Peninsula and the Royal Docks, carrying up to 2,500 passengers an hour 50 metres in the air. It is designed to cut journey times between the O2 arena and the Excel exhibition centre – both of which are Olympic locations. The privately – funded system could provide a crossing every 30 seconds.

3. They also plan to have 80% of athletes travel less than 20 minutes to their event. This Park would be served by ten separate railway lines with a combined capacity of 240,000 passengers per hour. Park – and – ride plans are also among the many plans aimed at reducing road traffic levels during the games.

4. A London Underground train decorated to promote London’s Olympic bid – this coincided with plans for investment in the city’s public transport network.

5. Concerns have been expressed at the logistics of spectators traveling to the events scheduled for outside of London. In particular, the sailing events at Portland are in an area with no direct motorway connection, and with local roads that are heavily congested by existing tourist traffic in the summer. There is also only limited scope for extra services on the South Western Main Line beyond Southampton, without new infrastructure.

6. The Olympic Games’ organisers say that having analyzed past Olympic sailing events, they would expect fewer spectators than recent events such as the Carnival and Tall Ships Race, this despite the United Kingdom being at the top of the sailing medal table at the previous three Olympic Games.

7. In January 2010 the South East England regional transport board criticised plans published by the Olympics Development Authority for not providing plans of a credible long term coach network saying “The ODA has been working on an extensive network of coach services… [ but ] the lack of reference to this work [ in the plan ] is both intriguing and at the same time concerning.”

8. On 15 February 2010, the ODA announced that First Group was the preferred bidder for the provision of bus and coach services for the games. This will involve the provision of venue shuttle and park and ride services, services connecting peripheral park and ride sites on the M25 with the Olympic Park and Ebbsfleet, and a nationwide network of express coaches to the Olympic Park, and the Weymouth and Portland sailing venue.

9. The services will require around 900 vehicles in total, although some will be sub – contracted.

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London Paralympics Venues and Infrastructure 2012

1. The 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games will use a mixture of new venues, existing and historic facilities, and temporary facilities, some of them in well – known locations such as Hyde Park and Horse Guards Parade.

2. In the wake of the problems that plagued the Millennium Dome, the organisers’ intention is that there will be no white elephants after the Games and instead that a “2012 legacy” will be delivered. Some of the new facilities will be reused in their Olympic form, while others, including the 80,000 seater main stadium, will be reduced in size or relocated elsewhere in the UK.

3. The plans are part of the regeneration of Strat ford in east London which will be the site of the Olympic Park, and of the neighbouring Lower Lea Valley.

4. This has required the compulsory purchase of some business properties, which are being demolished to make way for Olympic venues and infrastructure improvements. This has caused some controversy, with some of the affected proprietors claiming that the compensation offered is inadequate.

5. In addition, concerns about the development’s potential impact on the future of the century – old Manor Garden Allotments have inspired a community campaign, and the demolition of the Clays Lane housing estate was opposed by tenants, as is that of Carpenters Estate.

6. The majority of venues have been divided into three zones within Greater London : The Olympic Zone, the River Zone and the Central Zone. In addition to these are those venues that, by necessity, are outside the boundaries of Greater London, such as the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy on the Isle of Portland in Dorset which will host the sailing events, some 125 miles ( 200 km ) southwest of the Olympic Park.

7. The football tournament will be staged at several grounds around the UK.

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London Paralympics Bidding Process 2012

1. As has been the practice since a 2001 partnership between the International Olympic Committee and the International Paralympic Committee, the winner of the bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics also became the host city for the Paralympics.

2. On 6 July 2005, the final selection was announced at the Raffles City Convention Centre in Singapore, where the 117th IOC Session was held. Here Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Tony Blair was the only leader of the five candidate cities’ countries to make a personal lobby ( he had also been the only one to attend the 2004 Olympics ).

3. Moscow was the first city to be eliminated, followed by New York and Madrid. The final two cities left in contention were London and Paris. At the end of the fourth round of voting, London won the right to host the 2012 Games with 54 votes, defeating Paris’s 50.

4. Various French publications blamed the Paris loss on French President Jacques Chirac’s statements before the vote that “We can’t trust people [ the British ] who have such bad food. After Finland, it’s the country with the worst food.”

5. Two current members of the International Olympic Committee are from Finland. Several other news sources cited Bertrand Delanoë’s complaint regarding Tony Blair’s secret late night meetings with numerous ( African ) IOC representatives as having a more significant impact on final vote.

6. When reporting London’s win, British media covered the expectant crowds in both France and Britain ( and in the other bid cities ), and contrasted the jubilant reaction in London to the reaction of the crowd in Paris, where many had gathered in hope of a French win.However, the celebrations in London were overshadowed when London’s transport system was attacked by terrorists less than 24 hours after the announcement.

7. In December 2005, it was alleged by Alex Gilady, a senior IOC official, that London had won the right to host the Olympics only because of a voting error. A London 2012 spokesman dismissed this, saying “At the end of the day, it was a secret ballot. This is the opinion of one individual. The result is what matters and we are not going to be drawn into speculation.”

8. As has been the practice since a 2001 partnership between the International Olympic Committee and the International Paralympic Committee, the winner of the bid for the London 2012 Summer Olympics also became the host city for the Paralympics.

9. On 6 July 2005, the final selection was announced at the Raffles City Convention Centre in Singapore, where the 117th IOC Session was held. Here Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Tony Blair was the only leader of the five candidate cities’ countries to make a personal lobby ( he had also been the only one to attend the 2004 Olympics ).

10. Moscow was the first city to be eliminated, followed by New York and Madrid. The final two cities left in contention were London and Paris. At the end of the fourth round of voting, London won the right to host the 2012 Games with 54 votes, defeating Paris’s 50.

11. Various French publications blamed the Paris loss on French President Jacques Chirac’s statements before the vote that “We can’t trust people [ the British ] who have such bad food. After Finland, it’s the country with the worst food.”

12. Two current members of the International Olympic Committee are from Finland. Several other news sources cited Bertrand Delanoë’s complaint regarding Tony Blair’s secret late night meetings with numerous ( African ) IOC representatives as having a more significant impact on final vote.

13. When reporting London’s win, British media covered the expectant crowds in both France and Britain ( and in the other bid cities ), and contrasted the jubilant reaction in London to the reaction of the crowd in Paris, where many had gathered in hope of a French win.However, the celebrations in London were overshadowed when London’s transport system was attacked by terrorists less than 24 hours after the announcement.

14. In December 2005, it was alleged by Alex Gilady, a senior IOC official, that London had won the right to host the Olympics only because of a voting error. A London 2012 spokesman dismissed this, saying “At the end of the day, it was a secret ballot. This is the opinion of one individual. The result is what matters and we are not going to be drawn into speculation.”

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London Paralympics Handover Ceremony 2012

1. The handover ceremony marked the moment when the previous games in Beijing in 2008 handed over the Paralympic Flag to the new host city of London.

2. Mayor of London Boris Johnson received the flag from Mayor of Beijing Guo Jinlong, on behalf of London.

3. The handover ceremony was like the one used for the London Olympic Games. featured the urban dance group Zoo Nation, the Royal Ballet and Candoco, a disabled dance group, all dressed as typical London commuters waiting for a bus by a zebra crossing.

4. A double – decker bus drove around the stadium, being guided by Ade Adepitan, to music composed by Philip Sheppard which was already folded down showing a privet hedge featuring famous London landmarks such as Tower Bridge, The Gherkin and the London Eye.

5. Cherisse Osei, drummer for pop start Mika and Sam Hegedus ( who has played with numerous of Artisits including Pink ) then performed before the bus folded back into its original form, sporting a multi coloured Paralympic livery.

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London 2012 Paralympics Mascot

1. The official mascots for London 2012 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games were unveiled on 19 May 2010; this marks the second time ( after Vancouver ) that both Olympic and Paralympic mascots were unveiled at the same time.

2. Wenlock and Mandeville are animations depicting two drops of steel from a steelworks in Bolton.

3. They are named Wenlock, after the Shropshire town of Much Wenlock, which held a forerunner of the current Olympic Games, and Mandeville, after Stoke Mandeville, a village in Buckinghamshire where a forerunner to the Paralympic Games were first held.

4. The writer Michael Morpurgo wrote the story concept to the mascots, and an animation was produced; it is intended that this will form part of an ongoing series concerning the mascots in the run – up to the Games in 2012.

5. Two stories have been created about the mascots : Out of a Rainbow, the story of how Wenlock and Mandeville came to be, and Adventures on a Rainbow, which features the children from out of a Rainbow meeting the mascots and trying out many different Olympic and Paralympic sports.

{tab=Paralympics Logo}

London 2012 Paralympics Logo

1. The 2012 Summer Payalympics will, for the first time ever, use a logo sharing a common design with its accompanying Summer Olympics.

2. Along with its Olympic counterpart, the logo, designed by Wolff Olins, was unveiled on 4 June 2007, and is a representation of the number 2012.

3. The Paralympic version of the logo, along with its own color scheme, substitutes the Olympic Rings embedded within the zero with that of the International Paralympic Committee’s logo.

4. The 2012 Summer Payalympics will, for the first time ever, use a logo sharing a common design with its accompanying Summer Olympics.

5. Along with its Olympic counterpart, the logo, designed by Wolff Olins, was unveiled on 4 June 2007, and is a representation of the number 2012.

6. The Paralympic version of the logo, along with its own color scheme, substitutes the Olympic Rings embedded within the zero with that of the International Paralympic Committee’s logo.

{tab=Paralympics Flag}

London 2012 Paralympics Flag

1. On 26 September 2008 the Olympic and Paralympic flags were raised outside City Hall formally mark London becoming host city for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

2. Beijing Gold medalist Christine Ohuruogu raised the Olympic flag, whilst Paralympic Champions, Helene Raynsford and Chris Holmes raised London Paralympic flag.

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JEE Main

Application Form Submission 16 Dec 2020 to 16 Jan 2021.