Bharathiyar University’s achievements laudable in Higher Education

Bharathiyar University’s achievements laudable in Higher Education

The higher education scenario looked promising in 2007.

It was a year which witnessed colleges going for MoUs with foreign institutions and also with industries in the country. There were innovations also like a private college signing a deal with Krishna Sweets to identify, document and popularise ancient and traditional sweets of Kongu Nadu.

The research programmes offered by the Bharathiar University got a shot in the arm following tie-ups with varsities in USA, Australia, China, Korea and Japan-Improving the ’employability’ of the students coming out of colleges has been one of the focus areas this year.

The 47 placement programmes of the BU had . drawn a huge crowd of 72,000 students. However, the result of placement was only 14 percent.

It is here the focus need to be shifted, Vice-Chancellor G Thiruvasagam said and added that the university is aiming to improve its placement record from the existing 14 percent to at least 25 percent.

He further said that at a time when response to the basic science courses was poor, the nomenclature and the curriculum were altered to make these courses attractive and there was a “huge rush.”

Moreover, job-oriented diploma courses were introduced compulsory for both the UG and PG courses. The establishment of a constituent college of Bharathiar University (BU) in Valparai proved to be a boon to the underprivileged sections of that region, 90 percent of whom were first generation students.

The year saw the Bharathiar University appealing to its affiliated colleges to offer free education for poor students. Nearly 1,000 students were enrolled for degree courses in the constituent colleges.

“But for this attempt, the students would never have had a chance to access higher education,” said Thiruvasagam.

It cannot be overlooked that faculty development programmes were conducted this year with experts from industry, non-academics, with a view to infusing among the teachers the demands of the industry so that they could mould employable students.

Though the varsity feels that syllabus need to be changed completely to a need-based one, it did not get the support or participation from faculties.

“I am afraid I see only a 50 percent change in this respect,” said the V-C.

He noted the lack of industry exposure to students. Though Coimbatore is highly potential for such a training, the colleges had not responded to the idea fully.

The bygone year also witnessed the teachers of self-financing colleges work as ‘marketing representatives’, thus degrading their profession for fear of losing their jobs. That they are underpaid also is another serious problem which prevails in the private institutes of higher education.

A University without own Building

The formation to Anna University (AU), Coimbatore was a significant step in 2007.

Though the varsity still struggles to find a place where if can have its own building, it currently functions in the premises of Government College of Technology (GCT)

The year saw engineering colleges signing MoU’s with foreign varsities and as well as industries to expose them to the industries needs.

The campus drives where also encouraging with engineering and IT companies recruiting students from city colleges.

As many as seven colleges gained autonomy with the power to frame their own syllabus. AU encourages research and lays emphasis on courses on Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). The Varsity introduced M.Tech in Nano Technology and as many as 20 candidates have honed the course. The trimester pattern for MBA has enhanced the quality of the course and a marked difference in students from that of arts and science colleges. The state government’s announcement on starting government engineering colleges will facilitate opening of one college each in eight districts coming under the Coimbatore.